The manor-house Odden

Odden is the northernmost manor-house in Demark. It was built on a hill, surrounded by moats, rivulets and a lake.

 

Odden was the property of various, changing noble families until 1743. It included large streaks of land, many farmsteads and tenants. After the Reformation the church of the neighbouring village Mygdal also became the property of the manor. A large patriarchal cross on the southern wing of Odden may have signified this transition.

 

In the 17th century the building consisted of four wings surrounding a courtyard. The northern wing was demolished in the early 19th century together with the gothic gables. At the same time a small building destined for servants and farm-hands was added.

 

The two still extant wings with whitewashed walls and a steep red tiled roof date from the 16th century. During a restoration in 2007-2009 the remains of a fresco decoration from 1520-1540 was discovered. The interior of both wings was remodelled about 200 years later.

 

The painting above by Ferdinand Richardt is from 1855. It shows a lake in the foreground, connected with a nearby watermill. The lake disappeared in the early 20th century but may now be recreated as part of a restoration programme for the surroundings of the estate.

 

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